Overall Numbers

Poverty and Homelessness in Ohio--2009

 

Top 11 Counties by population in Ohio sorted by percentage of people living in poverty

County

Major City

Number living in

Poverty

Percentage of total population living in poverty

Estimate of Number of Homeless people

Percent of families living in poverty

Percentage of those 65 yrs. old and older living in poverty

Lucas

Toledo

80,184

17.3%

8,018

9.8%

8.6%

Mahoning

Youngstown

39,535

16.7%

3,954

12.9%

10.1%

Cuyahoga

Cleveland

209,216

16.4%

20,922

12.7%

11.5%

Franklin

Columbus

181,719

15.8%

18,172

11.4%

9.8%

Montgomery

Dayton

82,015

15.4%

8,202

11.6%

8.0%

Hamilton

Cincinnati

121,418

14.2%

12,142

10.4%

9.4%

Summit

Akron

70,513

13.0%

6,875

9.5%

7.9%

Butler

Hamilton

46,124

12.7%

4,382

8.3%

6.8%

Lorain

Lorain/Elyria

38,519

12.6%

3,659

9.8%

8.6%

Stark

Canton

46,674

12.3%

4,434

9.6%

6.5%

Lake

Painesville

18,232

7.7%

1,459

5.6%

4.4%

Other Counties in Northeast Ohio sorted by percentage of people living in poverty

Ashtabula

Jefferson/Ashtabula

16,223

16.1%

1,622

11.7%

13.3%

Columbiana

Lisbon

16,374

15.2%

1,637

12.05

6.9%

Trumbull

Warren

29,422

14.0%

2,942

10.7%

7.7%

Portage

Ravenna

20,164

12.8%

1,916

7.2%

4.4%

Erie

Sandusky

9,313

12.1%

885

8.3%

9.6%

Geauga

Chardon

7,231

7.3%

578

4.6%

4.6%

Medina

Medina

10,268

5.9%

821

4.3%

5.6%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OHIO

State total

830,204

13.6%

80,945

10.0%

8.5%

The Department of Housing and Urban Development released a report assessing the number of homelessness people in the United States in February 2007.  The researchers when pressed said that many studies have found that somewhere between 9-10% of a County’s population living in poverty become homeless in a year.  We used the figure from U.S. Census, the most recent figures available, the 90% confidence interval or the figure that the Census has the most confidence.  Then we applied the 9-10% figure that researchers had determined.  The higher the poverty rate the larger number we used. So Counties with 14% or more we used the 10% figure then 9.75% then 9.5% and on down to 8% for the richer counties.   While we did not count every homeless person, we feel that these are good numbers for planning and assessment.  It also should be understood that in Counties that have not recovered from the last recession including Cuyahoga County homelessness has only grown over the last two years. We are using the broader Department of Education definition for homelessness.

Compiled by the Northeast Ohio Coalition for the Homeless