Franklin County Homeless Population

These are based on the US Census American Community Survey poverty numbers.  These are estimates based on the number of people living in poverty (the higher the number, the higher percentage falling into homelessness).  These are based on the broader Dept of Education definition of homelessness and not the silly HUD definition of homelessness used by the shelters.  These have nothing to do with the January "Complete Count" that the County and HUD release.  Those numbers are mandated by Congress, but have no basis in fact.    These numbers can be found for each year on our Research Section of our website under "Overall Numbers" for each year.  This gives further explanation of the definition and methodology.

Columbus/Franklin County Seniors and Children in Poverty

These are based on US Census data from the American Community Survey for Lucas County home to the City of Toledo.   This demonstrates that the social security system, Medicare, and the local senior safety net works.  Every community has a government funds going to help seniors with transportation, day centers, and activities.  Government has been effective keeping seniors in housing and safe.  We have not done the same for families in the United States and we are seeing overflowing shelters and long waiting lists for housing for families.

Franklin Co./Columbus Poverty Population

This is from the US Census American Community Survey for Franklin County which is home of the state capital Ohio.   The top graph is by percentage while the bottom number are the raw numbers.  The numbers are posted in the research section of our website under Overall Numbers.  Franklin County took over as the most populous County during this time period.  We posted a comparison to other counties both by percentage and by overall numbers on the Information Blog.

Toledo/Lucas Co. Number of Seniors and Families in Poverty

These are based on US Census data from the American Community Survey for Lucas County home to the City of Toledo.   This demonstrates that the social security system, Medicare, and the local senior safety net works.  Every community has a government funds going to help seniors with transportation, day centers, and activities.  Government has been effective keeping seniors in housing and safe.  We have not done the same for families in the United States and we are seeing overflowing shelters and long waiting lists for housing for families.

Toledo Homeless Population Over Six Years

These are based on the US Census American Community Survey poverty numbers.  These are estimates based on the number of people living in poverty (the higher the number, the higher percentage falling into homelessness).  These are based on the broader Dept of Education numbers and not the silly HUD definition of homelessness used by the shelters.  These have nothing to do with the January "Complete Count" that the County and HUD release.  Those numbers are mandated by Congress, but have no basis in fact.    These numbers can be found for each year on our Research Section of our website under "Overall Numbers" for each year.  This gives further explanation of the definition and methodology.

Ohio County Poverty Numbers

These are the six largest counties in Ohio and poverty numbers based on US Census American Community Survey data.  Interesting notes:

  • During this time period Cuyahoga County lost population and Franklin County became the most populous County in Ohio.
  • Lucas County/Toledo saw a sharp increase in those living in poverty following the downturn but have reduced that number with Dayton/Montgomery County retaking the fourth spot.
  • The high water mark for Ohio poverty was 2012 to 2013 and has been on the decline since then. 

Akron Summit County Families and Seniors in Poverty

These are based on US Census data from the American Community Survey for Summit County.   This demonstrates that the social security system, Medicare, and the local senior safety net works.  Every community has a government funds going to help seniors with transportation, day centers, and activities.  Government has been effective keeping seniors in housing and safe.  We have not done the same for families in the United States with overflowing shelters and long waiting lists for housing.

Akron/Summit County Homeless People

These are based on the US Census American Community Survey poverty numbers.  These are estimates based on the number of people living in poverty (the higher the number, the higher percentage falling into homelessness).  These are based on the broader Dept of Education numbers and not the silly HUD definition of homelessness used by the shelters.  These have nothing to do with the January Count that the County and HUD release.  Those numbers have no basis in fact.    These numbers can be found for each year on our Research Section of our website under "Overall Numbers" for each year.  This gives further explanation of the definition and methodology.

Homeless Numbers in Cuyahoga County Over 8 Years

These are based on the US Census American Community Survey poverty numbers.  These are estimates based on the number of people living in poverty (the higher the number, the higher percentage falling into poverty).  These are based on the broader Dept of Education numbers and not the silly HUD definition of homelessness used by the shelters.  These have nothing to do with the January Count that the County and HUD release.  Those numbers have no basis in fact.   At this same time of this graph, we have lost 350 beds of shelter which makes it difficult to serve everyone who comes to the door.  We have seen increases in families who become homeless and single women.  These numbers can be found for each year on our Research Section of our website under "Overall Numbers" for each year.  This gives further explanation of the definition and methodology.

Cuyahoga Families and Seniors in Poverty

These are based on US Census data from the American Community Survey for Cuyahoga County.  Remember that Cuyahoga County population has declined in the last 7 years.  This demonstrates that the social security system, Medicare, and the local senior safety net works.  Every community has a government funds going to help seniors with transportation, day centers, and activities.  Government has been effective keeping seniors in housing and safe.  We have not done the same for families in the United States with overflowing shelters and long waiting lists for housing.

Continuum of Care Funding 2016

This graph shows the downward trend in emergency service money for shelters and supportive services and the extreme rise in funding for permanent supportive housing.  It raises the question why do the federal homeless dollars go to support the permanent housing for people with long term health disabilities?

HMIS = Homeless Management Information Systems (the computer network that processes all the information of everyone who enters shelter or asks for homeless services in America.

PH/PSH=Permanent Housing and Permanent Supportive Housing.  These are the funds to build, maintain, provide case managers and the on-going rental costs associated with people who were homeless for a long period of time and also had some disability (alcoholism, mental health, AIDS, physical disability, etc.)  In Cleveland these are new projects such as Greenbridge, Liberty Commons or Buckeye typically of 60 single efficiency apartments spread out throughout the city.  In other cities, these involved renovated apartments not built brand new or mixed use facilities with multiple populations or even vouchers so the individual is placed in an existing apartment and the case manager comes to see them on a regular basis.  These individuals are typically placed into the housing from the streets before they address their sobriety or are stabilized on medication. 

PH/RRH=Permanent Housing/Rapid Rehousing.  These are typically housing vouchers in which the individual pays 30% of their income toward the housing and the government pays the rest or a short term rental assistance two months to six months while the head of the household finds a stable source of income.

SH=Safe Havens.  These are typically shelter for behavior health individuals and typically are crisis intervention housing.  The individuals can come in anonymously and get stable.

SSO=Supportive Services Only.  These are programs that help stabilize a person from legal assistance, identification or paying for a birth certificate, housing counselors, eviction prevention, applying for benefits, etc.

TH=Transitional Housing.  These are shelters that can house an individual for up to two years.  The individual does not lose their homeless status and usually comprehensive services are offered in addition to the housing.  These are typically housing for those in recovery since the alcohol and drug treatment programs are so limited, reserved for drug courts, and/or overwhelmed that they do a poor job of serving homeless people. 

These funds do not include Emeregency shelters which are funded by a separate pool of funding. 

Homeless Funding in the United States 2016

This is the breakdown of federal homeless dollars for 2016.  This explains why Cleveland has overflowing shelters--65% of funding for homelessness goes not to the emergency services but goes to the "permanent" housing of people who had a long experience with homelessness and were disabled.  These individuals may have not lived in the shelters in the last 5 years, but the federal dollars go to support their housing and the case workers on site.