Find Help

Follow us on Twitter
Donate to NEOCH

Homeless Voting
Tuesday
Jul262016

Voter Turnout Research 

Source: INCREASED VOTER TURNOUT IN THE NOVEMBER 2015 ELECTION BY LOW-INCOME RESIDENTS PROVIDED WITH VOTE-BY- MAIL ASSISTANCE BY NORTHEAST OHIO VOTER ADVOCATES (NOVA) VOLUNTEERS: A PILOT STUDY, July 25, 2016

Description of study:  (pdf of the report) Prior to Cuyahoga County’s November 2015 Ohio General Election, NOVA volunteers, at four sites frequented by a total of 200 low-income people, registered and/or helped voters fill out and process vote-by-mail (VBM) applications (NOVA registered over 1100 individuals at other sites of a different character). These registrations or VBM applications were later matched (by State Voices) against the state data base to see how many had voted in November 2015.  About 82% of NOVA registrations and nearly 100% of vote-by-mail applicants were matched successfully.  

The data were subdivided according to the site at which NOVA volunteers contacted voters, and at each site, the “turnout” of successfully matched voters was calculated, taken as the number voting as a percentage of those serviced:

A consistent pattern emerged at all 4 low-income sites: voters provided with VBM assistance turned out in considerably higher percentages than did voters provided with just voter registration.

The data were also pooled together for statistical analysis:

The turnout resulting from voter registration alone (28%) was essentially the same as that of the reference population (26%). However, the turnout from already registered voters provided with VBM assistance and processing was a remarkable 55%, which was a highly significant statistical difference from that of the reference population. Finally, the small group provided with both VBM and voter registration gave a similar result to the group provided with VBM only, but the numbers were too small for statistical analysis.

This research demonstrates that voter drives which stress vote by mail applications for both registered and newly registering voters will probably have higher turnout results than those which offer registration only. NEOCH will aim to apply this research in the future as we work on voter registration for the upcoming November 2016 election. 

Tuesday
Jul192016

Exits from Street Outreach 2013-2015

In both 2013-2014 and 2014-2015, of those who exited Street Outreach, more went to temporary and institutional destinations than permanent housing. In 2014-2015, the proportion of those who exited Street Housing to go to temporary and institutional destinations rather than permanent housing increased. Of those who exited Street Outreach in 2013-2014, 53% went to temporary and institutional destinations and 47% went to permanent housing; in 2014-2015, 70% went to temporary and institutional destinations and only 30% went to permanent housing.

Source: Cuyahoga County Office of Homeless Services System Performance Measures May 2015

Tuesday
Jul192016

Shelter Counts 2013-2015

Looking at the numbers above, which demonstrate a decreased number of individuals in shelter, it is tempting to think that we are doing a good job in reducing homelessness. However, in recent years Cleveland has lost 444 shelter beds. In 2014-2015 alone, we lost over 40 beds. Therefore, serving 8,000+ people in shelter is simply no longer possible. The reduced numbers of people in shelter may be a good sign, but may also simply be a result of reduced numbers of beds.

Source: Cuyahoga County Office of Homeless Services System Performance Measures May 2015

Tuesday
Jul122016

Types of Violence Against Homeless

In both 2014 and 2015, there were 29 reported hate crimes against homeless individuals that resulted in death. That was a 61% increase from 2013, when there were 18 fatal attacks. From 2013-2014, the number of nonlethal attacks increased by 17% as well. While the number of lethal attacks remained the same between 2014-2015, the overall number of attacks decreased from 115 to 77.

Of the nonlethal attacks in both 2014 and 2015, the largest amount of these were assaults with deadly weapons, followed by beatings. You can read descriptions of attacks against homeless individuals in 2014 and 2015 in the National Coalition for the Homeless’ report No Safe Street: A Survey of Hate Crimes and Violence Committed against Homeless People

Source: National Coalition for the Homeless 2016 Report No Safe Street

Tuesday
Jul122016

Hate Crimes Against Homeless

A Hate Crime is defined by the FBI as a “criminal offense committed against a person, property, or society that is motivated, in whole or in part, by the offender’s bias.” Currently, however, the FBI does not recognize protected status for people experiencing homelessness, and thus does not include violence against homeless individuals under the category of hate crimes. Over the past 16 years, the FBI classified 141 homicides as hate crimes, whereas the National Coalition for the Homeless has recorded 428 fatal attacks on homeless individuals in the same time period. In other words, around three times as many homeless individuals have been killed as a result of hate crimes than all of the other FBI protected classes combined. 

Source: National Coalition for the Homeless 2016 Report No Safe Street