Find Help

Follow us on Twitter
Hope for the Homeless

Donate to NEOCH

About NEOCH

This blog is dedicated to distribute current information about the Coalition for the Homeless in Cleveland or poverty or the state of homelessness. Entries are written by board or staff of the Coalition. The opinions contained in this blog reflect the views of the author of the post. This blog features information on shelters, affordable housing, profiles, statistics, trends, and upcoming events relating to homelessness. We welcome comments, and will remove offensive or inappropriate messages. All postings are signed by the author.

The Cleveland Street Chronicle
Jim Schlecht Event

Entries in early voting (36)

Monday
Oct312016

Last Week to Early Vote

Monday
Oct312016

Last Week to Vote Early

Non-Profit Vote has worked with NEOCH over the last few election cycles to help us alert voters in Ohio of the importance of voting.  We have worked with Cleveland Votes and COHHIO this year to register and get people to vote.  Early voting is the best for homeless people and those who move frequently because the staff at the Board of Elections are professional and know all the rules.  You also do not need ID to vote early.  There are rides available and one weekend left for early voting. 

Saturday
Apr182015

Voting Lawsuit Settlement Will Not Help Homeless People

The American Civil Liberties Union settled a lawsuit with the Secretary of State over early voting this month.  We got a couple of extra weekend days of voting, but we lost the principle.  I say we, because homeless people have been a part of lawsuits about early voting in the past and many of the Souls to the Polls ministers assisted with transporting homeless people.  This settlement did not help more homeless people to vote and it did little for poor people. 

Why can't people who move frequently register a change of address and vote at the same time?  Why can't we allow people to register and vote 35 days out while there is plenty of time to check on their eligibility? Or even 15 days out? There are states that allow same day registration and their elections are secure.  Isn't early in person registration and voting more secure than voting by mail where we have no idea who is actually casting the vote? 

All that trouble to sue and in the end it is not easier to vote in Ohio.  The so-called Golden week where a resident can vote and register in person at the Board of Elections was worth fighting for.  It was a symbol of the State encouraging the lowest income to vote by making it as easy as possible.   Golden Week was a turning away from the Poll Taxes of the South and all the efforts to make it hard for minority populations to cast a ballot.  This is a sad settlement which allows the State of Ohio to limit the ability of lower income people to vote.  If the conservatives can force civil libertarians into settlements that makes it harder for poor people to vote, where will they go next?  They base all these changes on "securing against fraud," which does not really exist.  What other fake threats can conservatives invent to limit access to the ballot box?  What other restrictions on voting will they test?  How far away are literacy tests or mandatory State IDs to vote or limiting the number of staff who can help with voting causing huge lines in urban centers? 

Brian Davis

Posts reflect the opinion of those who sign the entry

Sunday
Nov022014

NEOCH Files Suit to Protect Provisional Voters

As was reported in the Cleveland Plain Dealer and the Columbus Dispatch, NEOCH filed suit regarding the counting of provisional ballots with SB 216 against the State of Ohio. This is an extension of our 2006 lawsuit regarding identification and voting.  Our settlement was that homeless people without ID had a right to vote.   This typically involved provisional ballots, and so we had an interest in making sure that the County Boards of Elections counted the provisional ballots.

The new law required completion of the envelope without a mistake and would throw out the entire ballot if their were errors in the completion of the absentee or provisional ballot.  The problem was that there was not a standard that each County had to meet.  We attempted to negotiate a directive to clarify the law with the Secretary of State.  For a Secretary of State who was pushing for standard early voting hours, he would want a standard counting method throughout the state for absentee and provisional ballots.  We are afraid that there would be some counties who reject most of their provisional ballots on highly technical grounds while others would be more permissive. 

These were the same plaintiffs involved in the 2006 lawsuit who fought to allow low income voters to vote even if they did not have an ID.  We worked on this lawsuit since the summer and negotiated with the State over clarifications.  We were not looking for a decision before the current election, but we want the federal courts to decide if voter intent should count as opposed to the ability to follow sometimes confusing instructions.  Ohio should try to figure out a way to enfranchise as many voters as possible including those who have a difficult time understanding the written word. 

We hope that the court will allow us discovery in this case to see the impact on SB 216 on voting in Ohio.   We hope to be able to take a look at the percentage of rejected ballots across the state to see if there are discrepancies from one county to the next. 

Brian Davis

Posts reflect the opinion of those who sign the entry.

Sunday
Nov022014

Sunday Early Voting

 The only Sunday Voting took place yesterday and there were hundreds of people voting in Cuyahoga County.  They were only open from 1 to 5 p.m and the line was about an hour long.  We took over 7 homeless people and four did not want to wait the hour for the line to move.  There were lots of church groups, and many politicians who showed up.

Saturday was a miserable day, and the lines were a lot shorter.  The Board was open from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m and there was only a short wait.  On Sunday, the street was closed and they were only letting vans in to drop people off.  There was a festive atmosphere with many groups holding rallies across from the Board of Elections.  There were sign holders and lots of "souls going to the polls." There were people dropping off their completed ballots and people in cars with amplifying equipment pitching their candidates as they were competing with car stereos amplifying the Brown's game yesterday. 

The market spoke in Cleveland that voters like voting on Sunday and they want more of it.  With all the people dressed in their Sunday best showing up and casting a ballot with their fellow congregants, this seemed like a popular activity that people appreciated. 

Brian Davis

Posts reflect the opinion of those who sign the entry.